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Curriculum

Texas ECE offers a Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering with the option of two programs of study: Electrical Engineering or Computer Engineering. Both programs are accredited by ABET and have a common two-year basic sequence for freshman and sophomore level students to focus on the fundamentals of both electrical and computer engineering. In the junior year, students will select two areas of specialization based on their interests and career goals.

 

 

Basic Sequence

The courses that make up the Basic Sequence within the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering serve many purposes. First and foremost, these courses provide students the knowledge they need to be successful in the engineering courses they will take in theTechnical Component. Second, the Basic Sequence courses are designed to help students determine whether Electrical and Computer Engineering is the right major for them before they get too entrenched into the curriculum. Finally, the Basic Sequence courses are good indicators to help students choose the technical components they would like to focus on during their final semesters.

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Technical Cores/Components

ECE students choose a primary and secondary technical component to create a more specialized academic concentration within their degree plan. Please click on the link below for further detailed information on our tech core and tech components.

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Academic Enrichment

For students under 2014-2016 and 2016-2018 catalogs, they may select Academic Enrichment as their secondary technical core. For AE, the student selects 14 hours of coursework to support his or her personal or career goals. At least three hours must be an advanced math or basic science course. Before registering for these courses, students are strongly encouraged to click on the link below for further detailed information. 

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Free Electives

For students under the 2018-2020 and 2020-2022 catalogs, you will be required to complete Free Electives. Free Electives includes 14 hours of coursework to support his or her personal or career goals. At least three hours must be an advanced math or basic science course. Before registering for these courses, students are strongly encouraged to click on the link below for further detailed information.

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Non-ECE Required Curriculum

In addition to ECE coursework, all Electrical and Computer Engineering students must fulfill several other required courses and electives including:

  • One (1) Visual and Performing Arts Course
  • One (1) Social & Behavioral Science Course 
  • Two (2) History Courses
  • Two (2) Government Courses
  • One (1) Additional Upper Division EE course (18-20 Catalog only)
  • One (1) Approved 3-hour Free Elective (14-16, 16-18 Catalog only)

All coursework used towards the BSEE degree MUST be taken for a letter grade.


Visual and Performing Arts Elective

Each student must complete three semester hours of coursework in American Studies, Architecture, Art History, Classical Civilization, Core Texts and Ideas, Fine Arts, Music, Philosophy, Radio-Television-Film, Theatre and Dance, or Visual Art Studies. Note: Courses in performance, studio or ensemble are not permitted to satisfy this requirement. 

Social and Behavioral Science Elective

Each student must complete three semester hours of coursework in Social & Behavioral Science Elective. Some of these classes have sections that will satisfy either the Cultural Diversity or Global Cultures flag that is required for all Catalogs. 

Texas Legislative Requirement for Government

The Texas Education Code (Subchapter F, §51.301) requires Texas public university and community college students to complete six semester hours of coursework in government/political science, study of the US and Texas constitutions and related subjects.

Legislative Requirement for History

All students are required to take 6 hours of American History to fulfill the legislative requirement.  Please note that only three (3) hours of Texas History may be used towards the legislative requirement.

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